Pedigree imagery
Puppy Basics: Feeding Tips for the First 6 Months
Puppy Basics: Feeding Tips for the First 6 Months-mob

adp_description_block244
Puppy Basics: Feeding Tips for the First 6 Months

The timeline for feeding your new puppy changes rapidly over the first six months. Learn what and how you should feed your puppy based on the key development milestones she will experience.

 

Why Is It Important to Know Milestones for Puppy Development?

Due to breed differences and animal individuality, it is impossible to predict exact dates for a puppy’s growth and development milestones. However, by using the following milestones as a guide for healthy growth, developmental problems can be spotted — and possibly prevented — early on. By knowing these milestones, you’ll also know when your puppy is ready to begin weaning.

 

Puppy Developmental Milestones

Age Milestone
7-10 days old Puppies double their birth weight.
Puppies begin to urinate and defecate on their own.
10-18 days old Puppies attempt to stand.  
Puppies’ eyes begin to open.
Puppies’ ears begin to open.
18-21 days old Puppies hear and respond to noises.
Puppies begin to walk.
3 weeks old Begin weaning process for orphaned puppies.
Puppies begin responsive vocalization.
Deciduous (baby) teeth will begin erupting.
4 weeks old Begin weaning process for mother-fed puppies.
3–6 months old Puppies’ adult teeth erupt.

 

How to Wean Puppies with IAMS™

When your puppy is ready to begin weaning (at around 4 weeks for mother-fed puppies and 3 weeks for orphaned puppies), use this step-by-step process:
 

  1. Introduce a small amount of water in a shallow dish. Most puppies will play in the water; however, within four or five days, your puppy will begin to develop drinking skills. Some animals might require longer periods for training, so don’t be discouraged if your puppy resists bowl training.
  2. Begin mixing an IAMS ProActive Health™ Smart Puppy Original food with water. Be sure to provide a separate dish for fresh water.
  3. Gradually increase the amount of soft food while decreasing the amount of water in the mixture until your puppy is eating soft food only.
  4. Repeat the process, mixing the appropriate dry IAMS puppy food with the soft food, and then increase the solid food while decreasing the soft food until the transition is complete.
     

The entire process should take approximately three weeks.

feeding tips for the first 6 months header
article feeding tips for the first 6 months header
  • A Healthy Diet for Your Dog Can Mean Good Health for You
    A Healthy Diet for Your Dog Can Mean Good Health for You-mob

    adp_description_block137
    A Healthy Diet for Your Dog Can Mean Good Health for You

    As a veterinarian, I’ve found that pet owners take seriously the responsibility of ensuring their dogs live healthy, happy lives. They worry about making sure their dog gets enough exercise, receives regular wellness checks and receives balanced nutrition that gives them energy to run and play.
     

    What some people don’t realize is that owning and caring a dog can improve the owner’s health as well. Spending quality time with your dog and providing them with quality nutrition is good for the dog and can help ease stress and anxiety levels for you. Studies have shown that owning a pet can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels and triglyceride levels1 — which is great news for your heart health.
     

    In short, when your dog is getting the best care, proper exercise, nutrition and love, they can enjoy a long and healthy life. And that can ultimately make you healthier, too!

     

     

    So what does that mean when it comes to feeding your dog?

    Many owners see their dog as part of the family, and that sometimes means they will feed their dog like they feed themselves. For example, some people may choose low-carb or gluten-free diets for themselves and do the same for their pets. However, while this instinct comes from a place of love, many owners don’t realize that their dog’s dietary needs differ from their own.
     

    Take grains for example. As a veterinarian, it’s important for me to note that grains are good for your dog. Yes, you read that right — they’re good!
     

    A very small percentage of dogs may have a food sensitivity that requires a special grain-free diet or a dog food without a certain protein. However, this is not necessary for the vast majority of dogs. Most dogs benefit from a complete, balanced diet with healthy grains, high-quality proteins and essential vitamins and minerals.
     

    Here’s why: Grains are a good source of carbohydrates that provide healthy energy. Some grains, like rice and wheat, provide “quick” energy, while other grains, like barley and sorghum, take longer to convert to energy. A combination of these different grains can offer a time-released energy source that helps dogs sustain energy. The whole grains in IAMS dog food are a beneficial mix, as they supply steady energy.
     

    In addition to the grains you’ll find in IAMS food, you’ll also find high-quality proteins, like chicken and lamb, as well as essential nutrients needed to help support heart health. Together, this combination will give your dog a steady source of energy to be active on walks, runs, hikes or play sessions around the house.
     

    For your dog to be healthy and happy, be sure you feed them a well-balanced diet and allow them enough exercise time. In return, you’ll get unconditional love, plenty of sweet doggy snuggles and maybe even more exercise — just a few of the ways you and your dog are joined at the heart.
     

    1 https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health-benefits/index.html

     A Healthy Diet for Your Dog Can Mean Good Health for You

Shop Dogs

Shop Cats

Copyright © Mars 2022, Trademarks of Mars Incorporated and its affiliates