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Kitten Basics: Do Kittens Get Hairballs?
Kitten Basics: Do Kittens Get Hairballs?

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Kitten Basics: Do Kittens Get Hairballs?

Kittens can get hairballs, although it’s not as common as in adult cats. Kittens are adept learners, and as they grow up, their grooming habits will mature as well. This could lead to hairballs, especially if your kitten has longer hair.

 

How Do Hairballs Form?

Most cats spend a considerable amount of time grooming their coats. As they groom, they can swallow hair, which may build up over time in their stomach. If the hairball doesn’t pass from the stomach, the cat will attempt to eliminate it by coughing or gagging.
 

Many cats will get a hairball at some point in life, but some kittens, such as long-haired breeds and cats that groom excessively, are especially prone to hairballs.

 

How Can You Help Reduce Your Kitten’s Hairballs?

You can help reduce the number of hairballs your kitten or cat experiences in a few ways:

 

Change the Diet

The right diet can help provide hairball relief to both kittens and cats. For instance, the beet pulp in IAMS™ dry kitten formulas helps move hair through the digestive tract.
 

For adult cats, IAMS research has shown that cats fed IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Hairball Care pass 80% more hair in their feces than cats fed a leading premium dry cat food. By helping ingested hair to be passed from the digestive tract, IAMS hairball formulas help reduce the opportunities for hairballs to form. This fiber blend also includes a moderately fermentable component to promote intestinal health.

 

Ensure Skin and Coat Health

Maintaining skin and coat health may reduce the risks of excessive shedding, ingestion of hair from grooming, and, consequently, hairball formation as your kitten grows into an adult cat. High-quality, animal-based protein and fat, found in IAMS kitten formulas, provide important nutrients for skin and coat health.

 

Brush Frequently

In cats and kittens that are prone to hairballs, frequent brushing can help reduce the amount of hair they ingest, thereby reducing the risk of hairball formation.

Kitten Basics: Do Kittens Get Hairballs?
  • Why Antioxidants Are Good For Your Cat
    Why Antioxidants Are Good For Your Cat-mob

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    Why Antioxidants Are Good For Your Cat

    Antioxidants are good for your cat because they play a key role in minimizing damage to cells, including cells of the immune system.
     

    These important, naturally occurring nutrients help maintain health by slowing the destructive oxidative process of cellular molecules. They also can be important in supporting immune responses and vaccine recognition in cats. This may be especially critical for kittens that are being vaccinated while their immune system is still developing.
     

    Additionally, antioxidants can reverse decreases in immune-cell function for senior cats, increasing them back to healthy adult levels.

     

    Antioxidants in IAMS™ Cat Foods

    Antioxidants are nutrients found naturally in the body and in plants such as fruits and vegetables. Common antioxidants include vitamin C, vitamin E and certain compounds called carotenoids (including lutein and beta-carotene). A blend of several antioxidants in moderate amounts may be more effective than high levels of one antioxidant.

     

    How Antioxidants Work

    As cells function normally in the body, they produce damaged molecules called free radicals. These free radicals are highly unstable and steal components from other cellular molecules, such as fat, protein or DNA, thereby spreading the damage.
     

    This damage continues in a chain reaction, and entire cells soon become damaged and die in a process called peroxidation. Peroxidation is useful because it helps the body destroy cells that have outlived their usefulness and kills germs and parasites. However, when left unchecked, peroxidation also destroys or damages healthy cells.
     

    Antioxidants help prevent widespread cellular destruction by willingly donating components to stabilize free radicals. More importantly, antioxidants return to the surface of the cell to stabilize rather than damage other cellular components.
     

    When there are not enough antioxidants to hold peroxidation in check, free radicals begin damaging healthy cells, which can lead to problems. For example, free radical damage to immune cells can lead to an increased risk of infection.

     

    Antioxidants and Your Cat’s Immune Response System

    Because antioxidants play a key role in minimizing damage to cells, such as those that make up the immune system, recent research examined the benefits of certain antioxidants on the immune response of cats. The results of these studies indicated that antioxidants are important in helping cats maintain a healthy immune system.
     

    The research also showed that each antioxidant benefits the immune system uniquely, so one antioxidant at high levels is not as effective as a group of antioxidants acting together.

    Antioxidant Source Function
    Vitamin E Plant oil extract, tocopherols Optimizes immune system’s T-cell activation
    Beta-carotene Vitamin premix, corn meal, chicken by-product meal and chicken fat Optimizes types of cells present in the blood, increases antibody levels
    in the blood and optimizes vaccine recognition

     

    Antioxidants and Aging in Cats

    Recent research also examined the effect of aging on immune responses. The findings indicate that as cats age, immune cell responses may decline. Including antioxidants in your cat’s diet can help reverse the age-related decrease in immune cell function, returning it to healthy adult levels.

    Why Antioxidants Are Good For Your Cat
    Why Antioxidants Are Good For Your Cat

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